Big Analytics Roundup (July 25, 2016)

We have some more summer reading this week; plus, Splice Machine announces availability of its open source Community Edition, and Google launches two new machine learning APIs. There are so many Spark stories I’ve created a special section for them. Plus we have the usual explainers, perspectives, and news.

Quant headhunter Linda Burtch repeats her survey of working analysts in her network. Preference for using SAS has steadily declined over the three years she has conducted the poll; this year a clear majority chose R or Python over SAS. Preference for open source correlates with education; the more you know, the less likely you are to use SAS.

Oracle, IBM, SAP, and Microsoft have all reported Q2 revenue and earnings, but Teradata is still crunching the numbers. I’ll do a general earnings roundup when TDC gets around to reporting its numbers. TDC’s stock price has outperformed the others since June 30, which suggests the market expects a good second quarter. Meanwhile, TDC acquires another consultancy and reveals who bought Aprimo.

Summer Reading

Adrian Colyer lists his five favorite papers from the past several months and outlines his philosophy, which you must read. And here is another link to last week’s top paper on data bazaars versus data cathedrals.

Splice Machine Shifts to Open Core

Hadoop-based RDBMS vendor Splice Machine announces general availability for its open source community edition and offers a sandbox hosted on AWS.  Sam Dean approves; Andrew Brust reports; Dave Ramel explains. Jack Germain describes Splice Machine’s changing business model.

Spark Stories

— Databricks’ Spark survey is still accepting responses. Go and fill it out if you have not done so already.

— The Spark PMC has voted favorably on a release candidate for Spark 2.0, which is now in packaging for general availability.

— On the Databricks blog, Jules Damji corrals Spark news from the past two weeks.

— Alex Woodie touts LevyxSpark, an enhanced Spark distribution based on open source Apache Spark. LevyxSpark includes some open source enhancements, plus Levyx Helium, an SSD-based key-value store.

— In a webcast, Alexander Ulanov summarizes options for deep learning on Spark.

— Sam Weaver explains how to use the new MongoDB connector for Spark.

Explainers

— Nita Dembla and Gopal Vijayaraghavan explain improvements in Hive 2.1.

— Siddharth Anand introduces Apache Airflow (Incubating), a platform to author, schedule, and monitor DAGs. Sounds like Apache Beam.

— Data Artisans’ Stephan Ewan explains savepoints in Apache Flink.

Perspectives

— Jack Clark profiles Google’s land grab in deep learning. Short version: TensorFlow is blowing away Caffe, Torch, Theano, dl4j, CNTK, and DSSTNE.

— Greg Satell theorizes about Google’s open source strategy as if a “razor and blades” strategy is something new and brilliant.

— In Fortune, Barb Darrow profiles cloud computing’s disruptive impact.

— Sam Dean confuses machine learning with artificial intelligence.

— Syncsort’s Paige Roberts interviews Dr. Ellen Friedman.

— Drew Breunig poses a theory about the business implications of machine learning.

— BuzzFeed’s Adam Kelleher attempts to explain bias, fails.

— IBM exec Rob Thomas co-authors a blog about machine learning. It’s about what you would expect from an IBM exec.

Open Source News

— Open source columnar storage engine Apache Kudu graduates to top-level status.

— Apache Chukwa announces Release 0.8, with security bug fixes, FWIW. Chukwa captures logs from distributed systems for monitoring and analysis. No, I never heard of it either.

Commercial Announcements

— Google announces open beta for its Cloud Natural Language and Cloud Speech APIs.

Hardware News

— Inspur, which claims to be China’s largest server manufacturer, announces availability of the Memory1 line of servers for big analytics. Inspur uses high-capacity flash DIMMs and memory expansion software to deliver up to 2TB of memory per server and up to 80TB per rack.

— Startup Wave Computing announces plans for a family of deep learning computers. Good luck to them. The history of computing isn’t kind to special purpose machines, which tend to eventually get buried by general purpose machines.

Funding News

— Redis Labs lands a $14 million “C” round led by Bain Capital and Carmel Ventures. Redis claims 6,200 enterprise customers and 55,000 accounts for its cloud service.

— Sift Security emerges from stealth, announces $3.25 million in angel funding. Sift uses graph analytics running on Spark and TitanDB to identify linked threats and incidents.

Big Analytics Roundup (May 23, 2016)

Google announces that it has designed an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) expressly for deep neural nets. Tech press goes bananas. The chips, branded Tensor Processing Units (TPUs) require fewer transistors per operation, so Google can fit more operations per second into the chip. In about a year of operation, Google has achieved an order of magnitude improvement in performance per watt for machine learning.

Google’s Felipe Hoffa summarizes Mark Litwintschik’s work benchmarking different platforms with the New York City Taxi and Limo Commission’s public dataset of 1.1 billion trips. So far, Mark has tested PostgreSQL on AWS, ElasticSearch on AWS, Spark on AWS EMR, Redshift, Google BigQuery, Presto on AWS and Presto on Cloud Dataproc. Results make Google look good, but you should read Mark’s original posts.

Meanwhile, IBM fires more people. More here and here.

Open Data Science Conference

The second annual Open Data Science Conference (ODSC) East met in Boston over the weekend. Attendance doubled from last year, to 2,400.

Registration was a snafu, because the conference organizers did not accurately predict walk-in traffic or staffing needs. The jokes write themselves.

Content was excellent. Keynoters included Stefan Karpinski (Julia co-creator), Kirk Borne of Booz Allen Hamilton, Ingo Mierswa, CTO of RapidMiner and Lukas Biewald, CEO of Crowdflower. Track leaders included JJ Allaire and Joe Cheng of RStudio, Usama Fayyad of Barclays and John Thompson of the US Census Bureau. Sponsors included Basis Technology, CartoDB, CrowdFlower, Dataiku, DataRobot, Dato, Exaptive, Facebook, H2O.ai, MassMutual, McKinsey, Metis, Microsoft, RapidMiner, SFL Scientific and Wayfair.

Prompted by a tweet, I stopped at the Dataiku table. The conversation went like this:

  • Me: What does Dataiku do, in 25 words or less?
  • Dataiku: DataRobot.
  • Me: What?
  • Dataiku: We do what DataRobot does.

At this point, it was clear to me that Mr. Dataiku either did not know what DataRobot does, or thought I don’t know what DataRobot does. So I changed the subject.

The next ODSC event is in October, in London.

Explainers

— Michael Armbrust and Tathagata Das explain Structured Streaming in Spark 2.0

— Adrian Colyer goes 5 for 5 for the week:

— Tim Hunter, Hossein Falaki and Joseph Bradley explain HyperLogLog and Quantiles in Spark.

— Microsoft’s Raymond Laghaeian explains how to use Azure ML predictions in Google Spreadsheet.

Perspectives

— Serdar Yegulalp cites PayScale data in noting that if you know Scala, Go, Python and Spark you can expect to make more money.

— Tim Spann weighs the advantages of Java and Scala, and explains DL4J.

— Sam Dean celebrates Drill’s first anniversary.

— Taylor Goetz delivers a brief history of Apache Storm.

Open Source Announcements

— MongoDB releases a new Spark Connector.

— Apache Tajo announces Release 0.11.3, with five bug fixes.

— Apache Mahout announces Release 0.12.1, a maintenance release that resolves an issue with Flink integration.

Commercial Announcements

— RedPoint Global snags a $12 million “C” round.

— TIBCO announces something called Accelerator for Apache Spark, a bundle of tools that connect TIBCO products with open source packages. While TIBCO refers to this component as open source, the software is available only to TIBCO customers, which means it isn’t Free and Open Source.

— MapR applauds itself.

Big Analytics Roundup (November 16, 2015)

Just three main stories this week: possible trouble for a pair of analytic startups; Google releases TensorFlow to open source; and H2O delivers new capabilities at its annual meeting.

In other news, the Spark team announces Release 1.5.2, a maintenance release; and the Mahout guy announces Release 0.11.1, with bug fixes and performance improvements. (h/t Hadoop Weekly)

Two items of note from the Databricks blog:

— Darin McBeath describes Elsevier’s Spark use case and introduces spark-xml-utils, a Spark package contributed by his team.  The package enables the Spark user to filter documents based on an Path expression, return specific nodes for an Path/XQuery expression and transform documents using an XLST stylesheet.

— Rachit Agarwal and Anurag Khandelwal of Berkeley’s AMPLab introduce Succinct, a distributed datastore for queries on compressed data.   They announce release of Succinct Spark, a Spark package that enables search, count, range and random access queries on compressed RDDs.  The authors claim a 75X performance advantage over native Spark using Succinct as a document store,

Three interesting stories on streaming data:

  • In a podcast, Data Artisans CTO Stephan Ewen discusses Flink, Spark and the Kappa architecture.
  • Techalpine’s Kaushik Pal compares Spark and Flink for streaming data.
  • Will McGinnis helps you get started with Python and Flink.

(1) Analytic Startups in Trouble

In The Information, Steve Nellis and Peter Schulz explain why startups return to the funding well frequently — and why those that don’t may be in trouble.  Venture funding isn’t a perfect indicator of success, but is often the only indicator available.  On the list: Skytree Software and Alpine Data Labs.

(2) Google Releases TensorFlow for Machine Learning

On the Google Research blog, Google announces open source availability of TensorFlow.  TensorFlow is Google’s second generation machine learning system; it supports Deep Learning as well as any computation that can be expressed as a flow graph.   Read this white paper for details of the system.  At present, there are Python and C++ APIs;  Google notes that the C++ API may offer some performance advantages.

Video intro here.

In Wired, Cade Metz reports; Erik T. Mueller dismisses; and Metz returns to note that Deep Learning can leverage GPUs, and that AI’s future is in data, as if we didn’t know these things already.

On Slate, Will Oremus feels the buzz.

On his eponymous blog, Sachin Joglekar explains how to do k-means clustering with TensorFlow.

Separately, in VentureBeat, Jordan Novet rounds up open source frameworks for Deep Learning.

(3) H2O.ai Releases Steam

It’s not a metaphor.  At its second annual H2O World event, H2O releases Steam, an open source data science hub that bundles model selection, model management and model scoring into a single container for elastic deployment.

On the H2O Blog, Yotam Levy wraps Day One, Day Two and Day Three of the H2O World event.  Speaker videos are here, slides here.  (Registration required.)  Some notable presentations:

— H2O: Tomas Nykodym on GLM; Mark Landry on GBM and Random Forests; Arno Candel on Deep Learning; Erin LaDell on Ensemble Modeling.

— Michal Malohlava of H2O and Richard Garris of Databricks explain how to run H2O on Databricks Cloud.  Separately, Michal demonstrates Sparkling Water, a Spark package that enables a Spark user to call H2O algorithms; Nidhi Mehta leads a hands-on with PySparkling Water;  and Xavier Tordoir of Data Fellas exhibits Interactive Genomes Clustering with Sparkling Water on the Spark Notebook.

— Szilard Pafka of Epoch summarizes his work to date benchmarking R, Python, Vowpal Wabbit, H2O, xgboost and Spark MLLib.  As reported previously, Pafka’s benchmarks show that H2O and xgboost are the best performers; they are faster and deliver more accurate models.

As reported in last week’s roundup, H2O.ai also announces a $20 million “B” round.